India looking forward to bank on Solar power

In India, Solar power has become the catchword for many states in recent times. Internationally, the price of solar power components has been declining at 15% year over year, and states are leveraging this trend. India’s commitments on increasing its non-fossil fuel component of power generation to 40% by 2030 are substantial. Even though coal usage has been increasing too but India is confident to use more solar power. In Gujrat (one of the states in India) they have been using Solar power a bit for a while. The project was the brainchild of Narendra Modi. As chief minister of Gujarat, Modi spurred companies to build more than 900MW of solar plant across the state in just a couple of years. Now, as prime minister, the question is whether he can repeat the feat across India, which receives more sunlight than any other country in the G20. India’s booming cities are another huge challenge, with many struggling with blackouts, particularly when temperatures soar and air conditioning is ramped up. Again, Modi’s 13-year tenure in Gujarat is providing the solar template. In September, it was announced that rooftop solar power projects in the state capital, Gandhinagar, will be replicated in Punjab and Delhi, where a storm at the end of May plunged its fragile grid into rolling blackouts for a week.

Delhi is ever more power-hungry, but with little open land and 300-plus days of sunshine a year, rooftop solar is an attractive solution. India’s pledge document talks about increasing nuclear power from 5 GW to 63 GW by 2032 and doubling wind capacity to 60 GW by 2022. But the most ambitious is the plan to increase solar capacity from 4 GW to 100 GW in the next seven years. With the liability issue bogging down nuclear, much of the heavy lifting may have to be done by solar and, to some extent, wind.

Solar power has become the catchword for many states in recent times. Internationally, the price of solar power components has been declining at 15% year over year, and states are leveraging this trend to get good deals. Recently, Madhya Pradesh was able to beat down the price it will have to pay for power from a solar project to Rs 5.05 a unit.
The pledge document says: “A scheme for development of 25 solar parks, ultra mega solar power projects, canal top solar projects and 1,00,000 solar pumps for farmers is at different stages of implementation.” The 100 GW expansion planned nationwide would need acquisition of nearly 5 lakh acres of land – at least three times the size of Mumbai.

I really hope India start using more non fossil fuels and less charcoal.

Source: The guardian, TOI

Australia: The first country to have Tesla’s power battery

Tesla’s new ‘Powerwall’ battery which can save excess energy which can be used to later on will hit the markets of Australia late this year. It is being launched well before the predictions in early 2016. Even if those who have already installed the solar panels for them it should be a great news.

The standard model being plugged by Tesla — for the average household — is the 7kWh Powerwall. Tesla Energy will also be supplying 10kWh Powerwalls however, along with the commercial and utility scale Powerpack, which groups powerful 100kWh battery blocks for anywhere from 500kWh to upwards of 10MWh.

There are also numerous energy companies who want to distribute the Tesla’s battery in the Australian Market. Similar to the battery in the Model S, the Powerwall is a rechargeable lithium-ion battery, only this one can be mounted on the wall of your house. The biggest markets for battery storage in Australia will be those areas that pay little for the output from solar arrays to the grid. This includes all new installations, and in areas like NSW ( New south wales), where 160,000 households will lose their solar premium tariffs at the end of 2016. Labor of has set a target of Australia generating 50% of its electricity from renewable energy by 2030, even if there are yet no details on the implementation of it.

What will be the price and eventual feedback, we are really looking forward to it!

Source: Gizmondo, The Guardian, Renewable energy

Sustainer Homes

As you may noticed, Pushkar and me we are reporting quite often about pilot projects and plans on how to apply new knowledge on sustainability in the real world.

Today I would like to present you another project; the dream of everyone studying and working in the field of sustainability: Sustainer Homes, a house created by a startup from the Netherlands, that produces all the energy it needs out of local renewable energy sources.

As you can see in picture above, it is a 30 square meters container that originally were just normal transport containers. Isolation on the inside is made completely out of organic and recycled material, the wall color is anti-toxic and on a hemp basis.

The watersystem within the container and the heating system is powered by solar pannels that can generate up to 5 thousand kilowatts in one year, wind powered electricity generators and a rainwater collector that supplies fresh water. The generated electricity power gets stored in such that even in moments without wind and sun there is enough electricity left to supply the container with energy. Dark water gets filtered before it gets released into the environment.

And if I tell you that the price of this “house” you wont believe it: Only 75 thousand euros is what the designers want you to pay for this kind of accommodation. And the best thing, you will never ever have to pay for water, electricity, gas and all the other bills one has to pay.

Big thumbs up to lifegate.it for the original article, and an applause to Sustainer Homes that make such an incredible thing real.

Foto © www.sustainerhomes.nl